Air Pollution Control Program

Clean Up Missouri Diesel Emissions

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources received two grants from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for a total of nearly $2 million in federal funds. The funding comes under the National Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program. The Air Program submitted two applications under this competitive grant and both applications were selected to receive full funding.  The two grant projects selected are known as the Clean Up Missouri Diesel Emissions Project and the Breathe Easy Missouri Project, each of which were selected to receive nearly $1 million in federal funds. Both grants target four separate areas of the state including St. Louis, Kansas City, southwest Missouri and southeast Missouri.  Four different organizations were awarded subgrants to implement the two projects in their respective areas of the state.

Clean Up Missouri Diesel Emissions Project
The Clean Up Missouri Diesel Emissions Project included a focus on school bus retrofits and replacements, but also one engine repower for a tug/tow boat and idle reduction retrofits for switch locomotives. Many of the projects focus on diesel engine idle reduction technology. Idling diesel engines emit unnecessary harmful pollutants into the ambient air and waste fuel and increase engine wear. By eliminating unnecessary diesel engine idling, this project will improve air quality, conserve diesel fuel and reduce operating costs for the fleet owners included in the project.

In Kansas City, five shore power idle reduction systems will be installed at two different rail yards and seven switch locomotives will be retrofitted with hardware to allow them to connect to these systems. Locomotives operate in areas of extremely disproportionately high levels of diesel emissions. Many rail yards are also located in highly populated areas and are near or in environmental justice communities. Reducing the emissions in and around these yards will reduce the public’s exposure to diesel exhaust. Locomotive shore power idle reduction systems will reduce emissions and lower operating costs. This idle reduction technology will result in the conservation of diesel fuel, which will make the facilities' operation more sustainable, thus decreasing America’s dependency on foreign oil. For more information about EPA verified idle reduction technology for medium and heavy duty diesel fleets, see EPA’s verified idle reduction technology list.

The estimated projected annual and lifetime emission reductions and fuel savings expected from all projects implemented under the Clean Up Missouri Diesel Emissions National DERA Program can be seen in the table below, along with the estimated projection of annual monetary health benefits to result from the project.  The projected emission reductions, fuel savings and health benefits were calculated using the EPA’s Diesel Emission Quantifier.

Clean Up Missouri Diesel Emission National DERA Project Emission Results and Health Benefits

 

NOx

PM

HC

CO

CO2

Diesel Fuel (gallons)

Annual Reductions (Tons/Year)

287.43

6.71

16.24

54.27

1,178.45

106,166

Lifetime Reductions (Tons)

4,531.63

105.89

228.76

765.94

25,336.28

2,282.547

Annual Monetary Health Benefits Based Solely on PM2.5 Reductions:
$5,822,560

Below is a summary of the specific projects expected to be implemented in each of the four areas of the state. Additionally, the subgrantee organizations implementing and overseeing the projects in each area of the state are listed below.

St. Louis area
St. Louis Regional Clean Cities received a subgrant from the Air Program to implement and oversee the project. St. Louis Regional Clean Cities is an agency covering the St. Louis region and is dedicated to promoting air quality and the use of alternative fuels. The table below summarizes the project to be implemented in the St. Louis area.

St. Louis Area Project

School District

Number of Buses

Technology

DeSoto School District

23

Diesel Oxidation Catalysts and Fuel Operated Heaters

school bus     fuel operated heater

Kansas City area
The Mid-America Regional Council received a subgrant from the Air Program to implement and oversee the project. Mid-America Regional Council is a regional metropolitan planning agency covering the Kansas City area. This council promotes economic development, transportation and environmental quality throughout the region. In 2009, Mid-America Regional Council received a grant to fund the Regional Air Quality Public Education Program. This program serves to educate Kansas City area residents about protecting air quality and has been instrumental in developing and maintaining the Regional Clean Air Action Plan which promotes voluntary measures that citizens can take every day to reduce their impact on air quality. The data collection assistance that Mid-America Regional Council provides to the state and local air programs assures that relevant and quality assured data is available to regional air quality planners. The table below summarizes the project to be implemented in the Kansas City area.

Kansas City Area Project

Fleet Owner

Type of Vehicle

Number of Vehicles

Technology

Liberty School District

School bus

21

Fuel Operated Heaters and Closed Crankcase Ventilation Systems

School bus
15
Fuel Operated Heaters

Lee’s Summit School District

School bus

1

Early Replacement

Blue Springs School District

School bus

30

Fuel Operated Heaters and Closed Crankcase Ventilation Systems

Independence School District
School bus
6
Fuel Operated Heaters and Closed
Crankcase Ventilation Systems
Norfolk Southern Railways
Switch Locomotive
7
Shore power idle reduction at two rail yards

school bus

Southwest Missouri area
The Ozarks Center for Sustainable Solutions at Drury University received a subgrant from the Air Program to implement and oversee the project. The Ozarks Center for Sustainable Solutions at Drury University will be implementing the grant on behalf of the Ozark Clean Air Alliance.  The Ozark Clean Air Alliance is a partnership between multiple stakeholders, which promotes air quality throughout 15 counties in southwest Missouri. Ozarks Center for Sustainable Solutions at Drury University received a grant in 2009 to provide pollution prevention technical assistance and environmental and sustainability awareness to businesses, organizations, local governments and the general public throughout Missouri's Ozarks region. The purpose of the center is to help organizations identify and implement pollution prevention opportunities to reduce pollution and operational costs. The table below summarizes the project to be implemented in the southwest Missouri area.

Springfield/Southwest Missouri Area Project

Fleet Owner

Type of Vehicle

Number of Vehicles

Technology

Lebanon

School bus

41

Diesel Oxidation Catalysts and Fuel Operated Heaters

Southwest R-V

School bus

1

Early Replacement

Kirbyville R-VI

School bus

3

Diesel Oxidation Catalysts and Fuel Operated Heaters

School bus

4

Fuel Operated Heaters

Joplin School District

School bus

3

Early Replacement

Dallas County School District

School bus

1

Early Replacement

Willard R-II

School bus

2

Early Replacement

School bus

7

Fuel Operated Heaters

Logan-Rogersville School District

School bus

1

Early Replacement

Ozark School District
School bus
2
Diesel Oxidation
Catalysts and Fuel
Operated Heaters

Southeast Missouri area
The Southeast Missouri Regional Planning and Economic Development Commission received a subgrant from the Air Program to implement and oversee the project. The Southeast Missouri Regional Planning and Economic Development Commission is currently developing a Clean Air Action Plan for the area and has participated in several clean diesel grant projects in the past.

Southeast Missouri Area Project

Fleet Owner

Type of Vehicle

Number of Vehicles

Technology

Osage Marine, Inc.

Tug/Tow Boat

1 boat with 2 engines

Engine Repowers

The Air Pollution Control Program is committed to reducing diesel emissions in Missouri. Diesel emissions contain oxides of nitrogen as well as volatile organic compounds, which in the presence of sunlight react to form ground-level ozone. Ozone is known to cause and aggravate respiratory diseases such as asthma. Missouri currently has several areas in the state that are designated nonattainment under EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, which is set to establish limits on ground level ozone concentrations that will protect public health. 

Diesel emissions also contain fine particulate matter, which can penetrate deep into people’s lungs past their natural defenses. This can lead to a variety of different lung and respiratory disease including lung cancer. Reducing diesel emissions, particularly in areas with disproportionately high concentrations of air pollutants is vital to the Air Program’s mission of protecting public health.

The fleet owners included in the project have begun procuring their equipment and some have begun to purchase and to install the equipment on their fleets. Each of the four subgrantees included in the project have detailed information about the project in each of their respective areas of the state listed on their websites. This project is expected to result in numerous public health and economic benefits. This grant has an expected completion date of Dec. 31, 2014.