Air Pollution Control Program

The 8-Hour Ozone Designation Process

Ozone 101 | The Ozone Designation Process |
The 2008 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS Boundary Designation Process
Stakeholder Involvement
| Supporting Data
Meetings | Minutes | Guides and Technical Documents |
Revised Timeline for Final Designations | NAAQS Area Boundary Designations

Ozone 101
Ozone is a primary pollutant of concern in Missouri. Air quality measured against the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, or NAAQS, shows that areas across the state continue to have difficulty attaining and maintaining the standard. If an area monitors or contributes to violations of the ozone standard, actions must be taken to help prevent the emissions that contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone.

Ground-level ozone, commonly known as smog, is an irritant that damages lung tissue, aggravates heart and respiratory disease and can even cause problems for healthy individuals who spend a lot of time outdoors. Typically, ozone pollution is a problem in the hot summer months from late May to early September when higher temperatures cause a chemical reaction to take place between volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides. Ozone levels from the combustion of fossil fuels tend to rise mid-morning, several hours after the rush-hour and peak in the late afternoon.

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The Ozone Designation Process
EPA is ultimately the agency that determines whether areas will be designated nonattainment or attainment/unclassifiable under any NAAQS and they are required to finalize the designations for a newly revised NAAQS within two years after the revised NAAQS is finalized.  However, States are allowed to offer boundary designation recommendations to EPA along with technical supporting documentation within one year after a new NAAQS is finalized. 

When determining designations, first ambient air quality monitoring data is reviewed and compared to the new NAAQS.  If any monitors are violating the new NAAQS then that monitor must be part of a nonattainment area.  Next the sizes of the nonattainment areas must be determined.  The Clean Air Act requires that any area that is significantly contributing to a violating monitor must be included in the nonattainment area of the violating monitor for which it is contributing.

EPA typically releases guidance to determine whether areas are significantly contributing to a violating monitor or not.  Since ozone is a regional pollutant, nonattainment areas are almost never smaller than county-size, and often times include a cluster of counties surrounding the violating monitors.  For more information see the historical Boundary Guidance on Air Quality Designations provided by EPA.  The table below lists the 11 criteria used in the designation process.  Additional information regarding the ozone boundary designation process can be found on the 2008 Ozone Nonattainment Boundary Designation Process - Frequently Asked Questions.

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ozone Designation Criteria

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The 2008 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS Boundary Designation Process
The Clean Air Act requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to set NAAQS for pollutants considered harmful to public health and the environment. EPA recently reviewed the NAAQS for Ozone and strengthened them to a more protective level. The new ozone standard that was finalized in March 2008 was an 8-hour average concentration of 75 parts per billion.

The Department developed the State’s boundary designation recommendations for the new ozone standard and submitted them to EPA in March 2009.  These initial boundary designation recommendations were based on 2006-2008 ambient air quality monitoring data.  However, in September 2009, EPA announced their plans to reconsider the 8-hour NAAQS that was promulgated in 2008.  This announcement delayed the final boundary designations under the 2008 ozone NAAQS.  EPA proposed the reconsidered standard in 2010 and then after several delays in releasing the final standard, EPA announced in September 2011 that they would not be releasing a reconsidered ozone standard and that the 2008 standard would remain in place until the next Clean Air Act required NAAQS review of the ozone standard, which is expected to begin in 2013.

Upon hearing this announcement, the Department updated the State’s boundary designation recommendation under the 2008 ozone NAAQS based on 2008-2010 ambient air quality monitoring data.  This revised boundary designation recommendation was submitted to EPA in December 2011. Then in May 2012, EPA finalized the boundary designations under the 2008 ozone NAAQS.  All areas in Missouri were designated attainment/unclassifiable except for a fivecounty area surrounding St. Louis, which included the City of St. Louis and the Counties of St. Louis, St. Charles, Franklin, and Jefferson.

The revised boundary designation recommendation that the State submitted in December 2011 along with the letter from EPA identifying the final boundary designations under the 2008 ozone NAAQS are listed below.  The original boundary designation recommendations, which the State submitted in March 2009, are also listed because the State relied on many of the technical elements included in the original boundary designation recommendation when developing the revised boundary designation recommendation.

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2011 Revised Boundary Designation Recommendations Under the 2008 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS and EPA’s Final Boundary Designations Letter to the State

Revised 2008 8-hour Ozone Standard Boundary Recommendation (12/11)
EPA’s Final Boundary Designations Under the 2008 8-hour Ozone Standard (4/12)

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2009 Original Boundary Designation Recommendation Under the 2008 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS and Supporting Data

Boundary Recommendation Letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (3/09)

Meteorological Evaluation

Meteorological Documents
Regime Maps
Wind Rose
Weather Tables XLS

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Kansas City Area Original Recommendation (Submitted March 2009)

Revised Recommendation Summary
Supporting Data Tables XLS
Revised Technical Support Document
Supporting Data Figures 1 MB

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St. Louis Area Original Recommendation (Submitted March 2009)

Revised Recommendation Summary
Supporting Data Tables XLS
Revised Technical Support Document 1 MB
Supporting Data Figures 2 MB

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Southeast Missouri Area Original Recommendation (Submitted March 2009)

Revised Recommendation Summary
Supporting Data Tables XLS
Revised Technical Support Document 1 MB
Supporting Data Figures 1 MB

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Springfield/Southwest Missouri Area Original Recommendation (Submitted March 2009)

Revised Recommendation Summary
Supporting Data Tables XLS
Revised Technical Support Document
Supporting Data Figures 1.4 MB

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Meetings

The Department held stakeholder meetings prior to submitting the original area designation recommendations to EPA.  The purpose of these meetings was to inform the public of the designation process and gather public input throughout the development of the area designation recommendations that the State would be submitting to EPA.  Three meetings were held in each of the affected areas of the State that had violating monitors based on 2006-2008 ambient air quality monitoring data.  The minutes from these meetings are listed below

Call 573-751-4817 for more information.

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Meeting Minutes

Southeast Missouri

Oct. 1 Meeting Summary | Presentation
Aug. 5 Meeting Summary | Presentation.
May 14 Meeting Summary | Air Monitoring Map

Kansas City

Oct. 3 Meeting Summary | Presentation
Aug. 12 Meeting Summary | Presentation 1.3 MB
June 12 Meeting Summary | Presentation | Air Monitoring Map

Springfield

Sept. 26 Meeting Summary | Presentation
Aug. 6 Meeting Summary | Presentation
June 13 Meeting Summary | Presentation | Air Monitoring Map

St. Louis

Sept. 30 Meeting Summary | Presentation
July 29 Meeting Summary | Presentation
June 10 Meeting Summary | Presentation | Air Monitoring Map

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Guides and Technical Documents

The tables below contain the data the department will use to develop boundary recommendations to the EPA. This data in some cases is projected and in others is actual data. Please review the data for your area. If you feel that more specified and local data is available, please use the links above to submit this data.

All State Technical Data

2009 Total Projected Emissions  XLS
Total Projected Population 2000-2030 XLS
Area Connectivity Spreadsheet XLS

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Southeast Missouri Technical Data

Population Density
Urbanization
Surface Meteorological Analysis for Farrar Monitor XLS

Area Trajectory Plots:

Farrar

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Kansas City Technical Data

Exceedance Days 2003-2007 XLS
Population Density
Urbanization

Area Trajectory Plots:

JFK -Wyandotte
Kansas City International
Lawrence
Leavenworth
Liberty
Olath
Richard Gebaur South
Rocky Creek
Trimble
Watkins Mill
Linn County

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Springfield Technical Data

Population Density
Urbanization

Area Trajectory Plots:

Eldorado Springs
Hillcrest
South Charleston

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St. Louis Technical Data

Exceedance Days 2003-2007 XLS
Population Density
Urbanization

Area Trajectory Plots:

Alton
Arnold
Blair Street
Bonne Terre
Clark
Clayton
Edwardsville
East St. Louis
Ferguson
Foley
Houston
Jerseyville
Margaretta
Mark Twain
Maryland Heights
Nilwood
Orchard Farm
Pacific
Queeny Park
South Broadway
Sunset Hills
Walton
Wood River

What You Can Do to Improve Air Quality
1997 8-Hour Ozone Boundary Recommendation - Historical information pertaining to previous ozone designations.

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Revised Timeline for Final Ozone Designations Under the 2008 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS

Date and Milestone

March 2008 - EPA issues ozone standard of 75 ppb.
September 2009 - EPA announced its plans to reconsider the standard announced in March 2009.
September 2011 – EPA announced that they would not be reconsidering the 2008 ozone NAAQS.
December 2011 – The State submits a revised area designation recommendation under the 2008 ozone NAAQS to EPA, which was based on 2008 – 2010 monitoring data.
May 2012 – EPA issues final area designations.
May 2015 - State Implementation Plans, outlining how states with nonattainment areas will reduce pollution to meet the standards, will be due to EPA (three years after designations).
2015-2032 - States will be required to meet the standard, with deadlines depending on the severity of the problem.

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