Lewis and Clark State Office Building

Formerly Named Green Office Building

Inner Resources Article July/August, 2001
"Green" Building Will Usher In Site Redevelopment

Missouri DNR Green Office Building logo.The selection of a building site has moved the department another step closer to its new "green" building. The location was chosen following an exhaustive 12-month process during which a total of 17 sites were rated using criteria developed by the department's Pollution Prevention (P2) Workgroup and finalized through a charette process.

Guiding principles based upon using sustainable design techniques were used in choosing the location. These principles were formulated using employees' expertise and the U. S. Green Building Council standards. They can be found on the department's Intranet site.

General Services Program Director Dan Walker said there were 12 potential sites originally identified. However, most of the sites were deemed inappropriate because the location was on prime farmland or within a floodplain, contributed to urban sprawl, or the size of the acreage was determined too small to house a 120,000-square-foot building. Five additional sites were added to the list and from the total list of 17 sites, five were chosen to further evaluate using the P2 criteria.

A state-owned site, adjacent to the present Jefferson City Correctional Center (JCCC) and on the same road as the department's vehicle lot and state surplus property, was rated as the most suitable. The land is located on a bluff overlooking the Missouri River. The building will be the first built as part of the JCCC redevelopment project and adjacent acreage will provide space for future expansion of state facilities. The building will serve as a link between the JCCC redevelopment and the wooded tract to the east of the building site, which is planned for recreational opportunities.

"The site will allow the design architect to integrate environmental design standards, provide inviting and accessible outdoor spaces, demonstrate responsible landscape practices to reduce on-site and off-site impacts and emphasize alternative transportation," said Jeff Staake, department deputy director.

The site also allows the department to demonstrate environmentally friendly landscape practices using native trees, plants and grass. The architectural design also will foster reuse of rain and runoff to water plants, wash state vehicles and assist in janitorial tasks.

Site development will minimize vehicle traffic and foster the use of carpools, public transportation, bicycles, walking and shuttle buses. The building will include shower facilities for those riding their bicycles or walking to work. A parking garage is planned for the entire JCCC redevelopment site near the green building. However, that structure will follow construction of the building requiring the department to work toward some temporary alternative parking strategies. Among them will be prime commuter parking and shuttle service from several potential locations to the building.

Streets leading into and surrounding the building, as well as throughout the JCCC redevelopment site will be improved. These infrastructure changes are needed to provide local residents, building occupants and redevelopment activities ease of access as well as to protect existing neighborhoods. City and state planners have begun work to develop this transportation network surrounding the JCCC redevelopment site and local neighborhoods.

The site has been surveyed and an environmental study completed. From the results of the assessment, a remedial investigation feasibility study may follow. If that investigation determines that the area is a brownfield, it could be used as a model to demonstrate the possible uses of brownfields.

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