News Release 546

Department warns tire companies to use only permitted haulers

Volume 38-546 (For Immediate Release)
Contact: Larry Archer
573-751-3807

JEFFERSON CITY, MO, SEPT. 20, 2010—The Missouri Department of Natural Resources is reminding tire companies to only use permitted tire haulers to dispose of their scrap tires.  Using an unpermitted tire hauler often results in improper disposal of the tires and opens businesses to potential liability.  

The reminder follows recent complaints filed with the department that several southern Missouri businesses were continuing to use an unpermitted tire hauler against whom the department has already initiated legal action for previous cases of mishandling scrap tires.

In July the department referred Kenneth Hall of Howell County to the Missouri Attorney General’s Office for illegally hauling and burning scrap tires in violation of Missouri’s environmental laws.  Despite his referral to the attorney general, his lack of a current hauling permit and his previous mishandling of scrap tires, the department has received complaints that some businesses continue to use Hall to haul their scrap tires.

The Department of Natural Resources is advising tire businesses that using an unpermitted tire hauler can result in liability for their business.   If a business’s scrap tires are traced to an illegal dump, the business can be held liable for removal and disposal costs, and may be assessed monetary penalties.

Tire haulers are required to keep their permits with them, so businesses can ask to see a hauler’s permit. Businesses can also call the Department of Natural Resources’ Solid Waste Management Program, 573-751-5401, or the nearest regional office to check a hauler’s status. Regional office service areas and contact information are available online: dnr.mo.gov/regions/regions.htm.

The department also maintains an online list of permitted haulers, updated monthly: dnr.mo.gov/env/swmp/docs/wthaulerlist.pdf.

Unpermitted haulers frequently leave the tires they are paid to remove at illegal tire dumps, which quickly become breeding grounds for disease-carrying mosquitos and vermin, or illegally burn them in large tire fires. Scrap tire fires are difficult to extinguish, and expose people to harmful chemicals. Tire fires release thick black smoke and can contaminate the soil with an oily residue.   

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