Strategic Issue 3.

Land available for productive use while providing for human health, safety and environmental protection
Protection and enhancement of Missouri's land resources is a broad goal that includes conserving agricultural land, dam safety, land survey and minimizing environmental impacts from mining activities. These initiatives protect human health and safety and help ensure that Missouri's land resources are available for everyone to use.

The Department of Natural Resources, in cooperation with the Soil and Water Districts Commission, protects Missouri's valuable agricultural land and water quality through soil conservation. Sixty percent of Missouri's land is in agricultural production. To date, 68,662,914 million tons of soil have been saved through conservation efforts. The resource and environmental issues impacting agricultural land management have evolved from the more traditional, single-problem issues, such as soil erosion, to more complex environmental issues, such as agricultural nonpoint-source pollution control, fertilizer and pesticide management, biodiversity and urban growth.

The Department of Natural Resources is responsible for minimizing the environmental and health-related impact of mining activities. Of the 170,060 acres of Missouri land disturbed by mining activities, 51,360 acres have been reclaimed or will be reclaimed. Of the remaining 118,700 acres, 55,400 acres of abandoned coal mine lands will not be reclaimed because they are naturally stabilized and are not a threat to public health or the environment. The remaining 63,300 acres are metallic and industrial mineral sites.

As of 1999, 29.7 percent of the original U.S. Public Land Survey corners have been restored. These corners are the basis of all land transactions and property descriptions. Continued efforts in remonumentation and preservation in historic and current survey records will decrease the cost of land surveys and increase the accuracy and reliability of property descriptions. Litigation about property boundaries should decrease as more and more corners are restored. This is becoming much more important with the increase in land values and the need to know the accurate location of property boundaries.

Through the efforts of the department, there have been no failures of regulated dams in recent years. Our objective is to increase the number of regulated dams in compliance with dam safety standards to 100 percent by 2005. These construction standards were implemented to protect downstream residents and property owners from loss of life and property damage.

Bedrock and surficial material geologic mapping was recently completed in the parts of Ripley, Butler and Stoddard counties. This basic geologic information will be used to prepare maps evaluating the seismic risk potential in that area. The department is now conducting geologic mapping in portions of Jefferson, St. Francois, Ste. Genevieve and Washington counties, an area of the state undergoing intense urbanization and development. It also will be applied to all waste disposal or remediation efforts in these counties and toward the protection of potable aquifiers.

The entire state of Missouri will have all its soils mapped by 2005, a culmination of more than 50 years of work. The geologic and soil information collected will assist in the responsible development of the counties by private industries, county and regional planning agencies and governmental regulatory programs.

Responsible management of solid and hazardous wastes
Improper processing and disposal of solid wastes can cause health and environmental problems, such as the transmission of disease, groundwater and surface-water pollution and air pollution. Solid waste includes garbage, infectious medical waste, waste tires, construction and demolition waste and industrial and commercial waste.

Managing solid waste is a challenge because of the increasing amount of waste being generated by households and businesses. Each Missourian disposes of approximately 1.12 tons of solid waste annually; a 12 percent increase during the last three years. Even with a slowly increased rate of disposal, Missouri is among the top states in the nation for reducing waste. However, our population and economic base continue to grow. Along with this growth comes more solid waste.

When mismanaged, hazardous waste poses a threat to human health and the environment. The Department of Natural Resources regulates the management of hazardous waste from generation to cleanup. The department registers all hazardous waste generators in Missouri and out-of-state generators that import hazardous waste into Missouri; inspects various hazardous waste industries and monitors compliance with the "cradle-to-grave" requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

The department has the responsibility to pursue the cleanup of abandoned sites contaminated with hazardous wastes throughout Missouri. The person or company responsible for the contamination conducts most cleanups, although federal and state funds are used for some sites where no responsible party has been determined. DNR also provides oversight for the cleanup of hazardous waste from facilities, such as Weldon Spring, currently or previously owned by the federal government. The department works with individuals and businesses that want to voluntarily clean up properties contaminated with hazardous wastes. This initiative is designed to return abandoned and contaminated properties, or brownfields, to productive use.

Decision making for the protection of Missouri's land resources
DNR continuously evaluates the needs of our customers to ensure we are producing the best products in the formats desired. Our constituents increasingly demand access to data and services through the electronic media, which includes the Internet. Continuously upgrading current procedures as well as transferring historical documents to an electronic format is an ongoing effort.

Protect and enhance Missouri's land resources
Outcome A.
Improved protection of Missouri's land resources (Show-Me Result) to be available for productive use while providing for human health, safety and protection of the environment

Outcome Measures

Issue 3 Outcome A1 chart.

Issue 3 Outcome A1 factoid.

Objective 1

Increase the percentage of Missouri agriculture land eroding at less than "T" (i.e., it is tolerable) from 65 percent in 1982 to 95 percent by 2006.

Objective Measure

Percent of agricultural land eroding at the rate which is tolerable ("T")

Strategies

Objective 2

Increase the acreage of mined land returned to productive use from 89,724 acres in 2000 to 93,822 acres by 2004.

Objective Measure

Acres of mined land returned to productive use

Strategies

Objective 3

Increase the number of United States Public Land Survey corners restored, re-established, monumented and registered in Missouri by 1,100 annually (cadastral survey).

Objective Measure

Number of U.S. Public Land Survey corners registered annually

Strategies

Objective 4

Increase the number of new Geographic Reference System monuments and counties with Geographic Reference Systems as follows (geodetic survey):

Objective Measures

Strategy

Meet with county assessors and municipal government agencies to promote the densification of Geographic Reference System control for mapping, Geographic Information System, and placing of State Plane Coordinates on corners of the United States Public Land Survey.

Objective 5

Increase compliance of registered dams with dam-safety standards from 95.4 percent to 100 percent by 2005.

Objective Measure

Percent compliance of regulated dams

Strategies

Objective 6

Increase the availability and usability of geologic information as it relates to land resources.

Objective Measures

Strategies

Objective 7

Increase annual geologic and soils mapping of the state's land resources as follows:

Objective Measures

Strategies

Outcome B.
Improved protection of Missouri's land resources (Show-Me Result) through environmentally responsible management of solid and hazardous waste

Outcome Measures

Issue 3 Outcome B1 factoid.

Objective 1

By 2004, maximize the amount of solid waste recovered.

Objective Measures

Strategies

Objective 2

By 2004, minimize the amount of improperly disposed solid waste.

Objective Measures

Strategies

Objective 3

By 2004, maximize compliance of solid-waste disposal areas.

Objective Measures

Issue 3 Outcome B1 chart.

Strategies

Objective 4

Remediate in excess of 500 sites contaminated by hazardous materials to a level appropriate for new development between fiscal year 1998 and fiscal year 2004.

Objective Measure

Number of hazardous waste sites remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and Voluntary Cleanup Program.

Strategies

Objective 5

Maximize the number of hazardous waste facilities that are properly managed.

Objective Measures

Percentage of hazardous waste facilities in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

Strategies

Objective 6

Maintain proper management of 100 percent of the hazardous substance incidents reported through the DNR's 24-hour Environmental Emergency Response telephone line.

Objective Measures

Strategies

Objective 7

Increase the number of drug lab collection stations established with local law enforcement from 13 to 21 by the year 2003.

Objective Measures

Strategies

Objective 8

Reduce the amount of hazardous waste generated (relative to industrial activity) from an average of 95 metric tons per generator to 85 metric tons per generator by fiscal year 2004.

Objective Measures

Strategies

Objective 9

Increase the percentage of tank sites remediated as follows:

Objective Measures

Strategies

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