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American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

Diesel Emission Reduction Act Program - DERA

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, or Recovery Act, allocated $300 million nationwide for the Diesel Emission Reduction Act, or DERA, program. All 50 states and District of Columbia applied for this funding.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency divided the funding into equal portions giving Missouri approximately $1.73 million for its State Clean Diesel Grant Program.  In addition, the Department of Natural Resources applied for a National Competitive Diesel Emission Reduction Grant and received approximately $1 million for two projects in Missouri. For additional background information on Missouri's Recovery Act Diesel Emission Reduction Act program, visit the Transform Missouri Web page and transform.mo.gov.

Examples of a few Diesel Emission Reduction Act Projects

Missouri’s air is cleaner thanks to these and the other diesel emission reducing projects across the state. Thousands of tons of pollutants will not be released into the air. Diesel emissions are known to cause and aggravate lung and respiratory diseases such as asthma. Reducing emissions is an important step toward protecting public health and improving the air quality in Missouri.

In addition, these businesses will save more than a million gallons of diesel fuel. Diesel equipment owners and operators saved money on upgrades and will continue to save money on fuel costs, allowing them to invest in other aspects of their business, like expanding or hiring employees.

State Clean Diesel Grant Program

The department distributed $1,649,764 in noncompetitive DERA Recovery Act funding to four regions in the state that monitored values at or above the health-based National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone. Those four regions include: St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield and Southeast Missouri. Reducing diesel emissions and the harmful emissions that contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone are important steps toward protecting public health in Missouri.

Former Director Mark Templeton of DNR presents Willard School District with two new buses.The department provided a subgrant to each of the following partners:

Under these subgrant awards, the partners provided funding to eligible public and private diesel fleet owners and operators. Both the public and private diesel fleet owners and operators used this funding to purchase and install EPA or California Air Resources Board verified emission-reduction technologies, idle reduction technologies, SmartWay technologies, engine upgrades, fuel conversion kits and/or engine replacements. The funding was also used to partially fund the early replacement of older more polluting vehicles or equipment with new cleaner operating vehicles or equipment.

Many jobs were created for mechanics and equipment manufacturers/distributors located throughout the state. The over-the-road trucking business also received funding that improved fuel economy and reduced the state’s use of diesel fuel. This in turn reduced fuel costs and decreased the price per mile that truckers have to pay to do business.

National Competitive Diesel Emission Reduction Grant

The department submitted several project proposals to the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency to apply for the National Competitive Diesel Assistance Program to target areas in the state facing the biggest air quality challenges.  The department was awarded $975,609 to implement the projects selected in St. Louis and Southwest Missouri. The department awarded subgrants to St. Louis Regional Clean Cities to implement the projects in the St. Louis area and to the Ozark Center for Sustainable Solutions at Drury University to implement the projects in Southwest Missouri.

St. Louis Regional Clean Cities

The department awarded a $228,250 subgrant to St. Louis Regional Clean Cities to retrofit school buses and various trucks to reduce diesel emissions. Controlling emissions from school buses is a high priority as children are more susceptible to the health effects of diesel emissions because their respiratory systems are still developing. Projects planned in this area are expected to reduce diesel emissions in the St. Louis area, which will improve air quality and protect public health. The projects include:

Southwest Missouri Area

The department awarded a $1,294,657 subgrant to Ozark Center for Sustainable Solutions to retrofit school buses to reduce diesel emissions. Controlling emissions from school buses is a high priority as children are more susceptible to the health effects of diesel emissions because their respiratory systems are still developing. Springfield area is currently monitoring values that are extremely close to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone that were set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2008.  The suburban areas surrounding Springfield are growing rapidly and the expansion is contributing to air quality concerns.  Additional ozone monitors have recently been placed near the Joplin area to determine the ambient air quality levels in that area.

Projects planned in this area are expected to reduce diesel emissions in Southwest Missouri, which will improve air quality and protect public health. The projects include:

Recovery Act Event to Celebration MARC and Kansas City Southern Railway for Recovery Act project Aug. 24, 2010

Recovery Act Event to Celebration Ozarks Center for Sustainable Solutions at Drury University and Willard School Distriction Feb. 25, 2010

Contact Information

Missouri Department of Natural Resources
Air Pollution Control Program
P.O. Box 176
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0176
800-361-4827 or 573-751-4817
cleanair@dnr.mo.gov email

Return to DNR Transform Missouri Page  |  Visit the Missouri Transform Site